Ores of Trance explores the aesthetic expression of Indian artistry

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By Mahtab Ahmad

Ores of Trance exhibition at Hauz Khas Village

Ores of Trance exhibition at Hauz Khas Village
| Photo Credit: SPECIAL ARRANGEMENT

“The power of zero in an artwork should never be underestimated,” says art curator TK Harindran, underlining the imperative value of silence in the work of a Cholamandal artist, S Bhagwan Chavan. He points to the artwork Shadows of the Palm Trees that combines warmth and darkness, using bright acrylic colours. . “There is so much happening and yet nothing,” says Harindran, describing the duality of chaos and relief presented in the artwork.

The painting is part of the exhibition, Ores of Trance by eight contemporary artists, which attempts to unravel the meaning of existence through non-figurative and abstract art. The 15 paintings, curated byHarindran, give an opportunity to abstract artists, especially Cholamandal artists, showcase their work in Delhi.

Ores of Trance exhibition at Hauz Khas Village

Ores of Trance exhibition at Hauz Khas Village
| Photo Credit:
SPECIAL ARRANGEMENT

Another Cholamandal artist, P Gopinath, has brought in four small paintings that add an air of internal depth to themes like freedom, cultural memory, and mundanity. Refraining from representing the physicality of the obvious, the works are an aesthetic presentation led by the artist’s life experiences. “It is like a musician making music , while also maturing with time,” says Harindran. The stark colour patterns in the paintings are reminiscent of the symphony that a musician creates.

Eternal Reminiscence by Hemraj employs shadows to signify vast plains and convey a certain longing for the past. T The free-flowing images possess a wind-like characteristic portraying a shade of despair forwhat is gone by.

Ores of Trance exhibition at Hauz Khas Village

Ores of Trance exhibition at Hauz Khas Village
| Photo Credit:
SPECIAL ARRANGEMENT

This idea of reminiscence is also embodied in Un-rectified Melodies by Rashmi Khurana. “Her memories of having livedin Punjab to now living in an urban setting is rendered into this transfusion,” says Harindran. It is an engaging painting created from paper pulp and represents the petals of her memories which have no boundaries. “Red is the core colour of my art as it signifies action,” says Rashmi who uses only recyclable material in her art works.

The non-restrictive nature of presentation is also employed in Black is Missing by Akhilesh, own forms of aesthetic expression of the tBhimbetka cave paintings in the Raisen district, of Madhya Prades.

“There is nothing and then suddenly something happens. One must not underestimate the power of nothing,” says Shobha Broota referring to her artwork. She uses geometrical representation in warm colours such as red and green that converge into unique expressions to highlight the subdued mind.

Ores of Trance exhibition at Hauz Khas Village

Ores of Trance exhibition at Hauz Khas Village
| Photo Credit:
SPECIAL ARRANGEMENT

The definitive shape of this artwork is a contrast to Jatra by Shridhar Iyer, which has sparkles of colours flowing like waves across the canvas. The theme of agitation is furthered through the work of Yusuf whose paintings show a form of dystopic struggle through a nightmarish window. The seemingly broken windows have scattered perspectives accompanied by a dark hue giving a sense of scare and desperation to the presentation.

“The title Ores of Trance signifies the poetic fusion of both these aspects whereinner ores are revealed layer by layer through a state of creative trance,” says Harindran. Most of the artists are from the Cholamandal Artists’ Village, a self-supporting artists’ commune located in Chennai credited for the Madras Movement of Art while also producing prominent works in the abstract school of depictions

At Gallery 1000A, G5-39, Daryacha building, Hauz Khas village, New Delhi; Till May 20; 11:30am to 7:30pm (Tuesdays closed)

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